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PILOT OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS (Page 7 of 16 pages)

e. The following maximum manifold pressures are to be used for "War Emergency"

ONLY:

"Never exceed 60 in Hg. in a climb above 25,000 feet.

GENERAL FLYING CHARACTERISTICS

a. Due to the counter-rotating propellers, there is no noticeable torque effect in any two engine flying with this airplane. Rudder and aileron trim tab settings do not require adjustment as a result of changes in airspeed and power.

b. TO INCREASE POWER IN FLIGHT

1. Move throttles to the new manifold pressure.

2. Move propeller controls to the new RPM.

3. Move the throttles to the new manifold pressure.

c. TO DECREASE POWER IN FLIGHT

1. Move the throttles to the new manifold pressure.

2. Move prop controls to the new RPM.

3. Re-adjust the throttles

4. Move mixture controls to AUTO LEAN is permissible.

d. The turbo superchargers are controlled by the same levers which operate the throttles. Rated supercharger speed is 24000 rpm allowable for five minutes and overspeed is 26400 rpm. The warning lights start to flicker at 25,600 rpm and burn continuously at 26,400 rpm.

e. On P-38J aircraft the intercooler flap should be open for take-off and climbs and nearly closed at all other times. Carburetor air temperature should not be allowed to exceed 45 degrees cent.

f. The airplane is stable at all normal speeds. The airplane becomes slightly nose heavy when the flaps and landing gear are extended. Release of drop tanks causes no noticeable change. Two-engine cruising below 170 mph i.a.s. is not recommended because the airplane requires more attention and ranges not increased.

STALLS

a. With power off., the airplane stalls at the following air speeds and gross weights noted.

                         15,000 lbs 17,000 lbs19.000 lbs
Flaps and landing gear up 94 mph 100 mph 105 mph
Flaps and landing gear DOWN 69 mph 74 mph 78 mph

b. As stalling speed is approached, the centre section stalls first with noticeable shaking of the airplane, however the ailerons remain effective.

c. In either power ON or power OFF stalls with flaps and landing gear up the airplane rushes straight forward in a well controlled stall. With flaps and landing gear down there appears to be a slight tendency for one wing to drop. There is however



This material is courtesy of Stan Wood WW2 P-38 Pilot in the Pacific.

More about Stan Wood and his P-38 experiances: Click Here